Glossary

Abbattimento

A fencing sequence as described by Achille Marozzo and Antonio Manciolino. Shorter and possibly more geared towards actual combat than the assalto.

Assalto

Partly or fully choreographded sequence of fencing techniques to be performed with a partner. These forms are described by Achille Marozzo and Antonio Manciolino for various weapons.

Becca Cesa

A guard hels with the hand extended high on the right side, with point towards the opponent and right foot forward.

Becca Possa

A guard hels with the hand extended high on the right side, with point towards the opponent and left foot forward.

CL

A roof term for guards that have the hand shoulder height or lower, extending to the outside of the sword-hand-side thigh.

CLS

A type of Coda Lunga where the hand is low on the right side and the point is held towards the opponent.

Coda Lunga

A roof term for guards that have the hand shoulder height or lower, extending to the outside of the sword-hand-side thigh.

Coda Lunga Stretta

A type of Coda Lunga where the hand is low on the right side and the point is held towards the opponent.

da Luca, Guido Antonio

Bolognese fencing master mentioned by Achille Marozzo. He was likely to be the master who taught Achille Marozzo and other famous swordsmen of the period, including Guido Rangoni and Giovanni dalle Bande Nere. It has been suggested that da Luca is the author of the Anonimo Bolognese.

False edge

The edge of the sword facing towards yourself.

Falso

Any cut delivered with the false edge of the sword. Most commonly refers to rising false edge cuts from the left or right side.

Falso dritto

A false edge cut ascending from the right side.

Falso impuntato

A thrust delivered in the manner of a rising false edge cut that hits with the point instead of the edge.

Falso manco

A false edge cut ascending from the left side.

Fendente

A vertically downwards cut.

GdA

A guard where the hand is held extended high on the right side, with the point facing forwards towards the opponent.

GdI

A guard with the hand extended to upper left, either straight or slightly withdrawn, with the point directed towards the opponent.

Gioco Largo

Wide Play, referring to a mode of fencing that uses the larghe guards, and involves a lot of movement and keeping the swords free.

Gioco Stretto

Narrow play, or constrained play. Refers to a mode of fencing employing the strette guards. This type of fencing involves actions where the swords are crossed, and can easily lead to presas and close quarters combat.

Guardia Alicorno

A guard where the hand is held extended high on the right side, with the point facing forwards towards the opponent.

Guardia d'Entrare

A guard with the hand extended to upper left, either straight or slightly withdrawn, with the point directed towards the opponent.

Imbroccata

A descending thrust from the right side. Typically starting from Guardia Alicorno, extending while descending and finally turning with a half-turn of the hand and returning into Porta di Ferro Stretta.

Largo passo

Wide step. Refers to a long posture, where typically the left foot is forward and somewhat diagonally to the side.

Manciolino, Antonio

A bolognese fencing master who wrote the first printed Italian book on Fencing, the Opera Nova originally in the 1520's. A second edition was printed in 1531 and many copies survive to us today. No surviving copies of the first edition are known.

Mandritto

Literally "right hand". Refers to strikes that originate from the right (sword-hand) side of the fencer. Mandritto is a roof term for these cuts, but on its own it refers typically to a downwards diagonal cut from the right with the true edge, a mandritto sgualembrato.

Marozzo, Achille

Bolognese fencing master, who was born in 1484 and died in 1553. Wrote a book on fencing titled Opera Nova, first published in 1536.

Mezza volta di mano

Literally half turn of the hand. An action where the forearm is turned roughly 180 degrees. Typically the action of switching between Coda Lunga Stretta and Porta di Ferro Stretta is a mezza volta di mano, but the action can appear elsewhere and in other forms as well.

Molinetto

A downwards wheeling cut done from the wrist and elbow, dropping the point to the outside. The cut can be delivered both as a mandritto and a riverso.

Montante

A vertically ascending cut usually delivered with the false edge. Not to be confused with the Iberian two-handed sword from roughly the same era that bears the same name.

PdF

A roof term for the type of guards where the sword hand is no higher than shoulder level, with the hand on top of the sword-hand side thigh or to the inside of it.

PdFA

A variation of Porta di Ferro where the right foot is forward and the arm is extended roughly at shoulder level. Extended end position of a mezzo mandritto sgualembrato.

Porta di Ferro

A roof term for the type of guards where the sword hand is no higher than shoulder level, with the hand on top of the sword-hand side thigh or to the inside of it.

Porta di Ferro Alta

A variation of Porta di Ferro where the right foot is forward and the arm is extended roughly at shoulder level. Extended end position of a mezzo mandritto sgualembrato.

Presa

Hold or a grapple.

Pugnale

A dagger.

Punta

Literally point. Refers either to the point of the sword or a thrust.

Punta riversa

A rising thrust that originates with the palm up from the left side.

Ridoppio

A rising cut delivered with the true edge.

Riverso

A generic roof term for cuts originating from the left side. Used by itself usually refers to a riverso sgualembrato.

Salto

A jump. Usually performed as a quick retreating action.

Sfalsata

The action of moving the sword point around the opponent's sword in order to arrive on the other side if the opponent's sword. Usually performed by slightly dropping and then lifting the point on the other side. In English this is typically called a disengage.

Sgualembrato

A descending diagonal cut.

Sopra braccio

Literally over arm. Refers to a guard where the sword is held over the left shoulder with the point backwards.

Sotto braccio

Literally under arm. Refers to a guard where the sword is held low on the left side with the point backwards.

Spada

A sword.

Spada a due mani

Two handed sword.

Spada sola

Sword alone. A mode of fighting with the single-handed sword without any secondary weapons.

Spadone

A two-handed sword.

SprB

Literally over arm. Refers to a guard where the sword is held over the left shoulder with the point backwards.

Stoccata

A rising or direct thrust originating from the right side. Typically staring from Coda Lunga Stretta and returning into Porta di Ferro Stretta after extension.

SttB

Literally under arm. Refers to a guard where the sword is held low on the left side with the point backwards.

Tondo

A horizontally delivered cut.

Tramazzone

A descending cut delivered by wheeling the sword around from the wrist. Typically done by dropping the point to the inside and striking a mandritto, but can also be done to the outside and as a riverso.

True edge

The edge of the sword facing towards your opponent.